French jacket trim, French Jackets, Uncategorized

Jacket Trim

Finding trim for your French jacket is easier when you are working with a multi color fabric, especially one with black, white or another neutral color. I think finding something pre-made for this color would be near impossible. You could introduce a contrasting color but often that’s not what you want.

Here’s a step by step tutorial on the process I used for this trim. If you’ve taken one of. my Zoom trim classes, much of this will be familiar. I used a silver metallic yarn for the base of the trim. Using a D hook, chain the desired length. Turn and make a double crochet in the fourth stitch from the hook. Chain 1 stitch. Repeat this pattern (double crochet, chain 1) in every other stitch.

If you make several lengths of trim, be sure to be consistent in which side you choose as the “right” side. Some trims look better when one side vs. the other is used as the “right” side. For this jacket, I used the side with the purl stitches for the right side.

I used the shiny yarn with variegated shades of teal. Some yarns can be pulled through the fabric. This one didn’t pull easily, so I cut closely along each shiny yarn and pulled it out. Tie the strands together and work a chain stitch along the long edges of the metallic base. To determine number of stitches needed, I make a sample using 25 stitches. Measure the sample and multiply number of stitches by the desired finished length. This jacket required 600 stitches for a length of trim which would go around the hem, along front edges and around neck. The trim for the sleeves and pockets was worked as another piece.

The trim is uneven and needs to be steam blocked into shape. I used the third from the largest tube from the Trim Tube set. Weave the tube in and out between stitches and steam. Hover the iron over the trim; you don’t want to compress it. The tube is 12 inches long so steam 10-11 inches at a time, let cool, and weave the tube through the next section. The ends where the teal yarn has been tied together will be tucked underneath when stitching to the jacket.

Stitch the trim in place. It works best to sew the outer edge around corners, then work the trim in place along the inner edge. The join between lengths of teal yarn can be tucked to the underside. The trim is very flexible and easily navigates curves and corners. I join the trim at the left hem.

When you’ve determined where to join the ends, press hard to flatten only the trim which will be turned under. Use a tailors clapper to flatten the trim as much as possible and let cool. Turn the ends under and stitch. The join will be almost invisible.

To create a finished end (nice on pockets and the sleeve vent), measure the finished length needed. Starting along one long side (it’s harder to stop and start at a corner) make the chain stitch with teal yarn. To turn the corner, make two chain stitches in each corner. One stitch for the long side and one stitch for the short end. Make 1-2 stitches across the short end of the trim. Then two stitches in the next corner. When you reach the starting point, pull yarn to the underside and fasten with a few small hand stitches. To secure the metallic yarn, machine stitch across a few times, compress the end with steam and cut off close to the stitching. The flattened end will turn under.

I will be offering additional trim classes via Zoom. Probably one in December and more starting in January. There are also a few openings left in the January class if you would like to work in person. We’ll be doing a variety of projects in the class: pattern drafting, French jackets: both starting one and completing ones already begun, dressforms and more.

My trim classes have sold out quickly in the past, so leave a comment if you would like advance notification of the schedule. Have fun creating your custom trims.

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